Persuasive Writing Sentence Openers and Connectives for Primary Level

Why use sentence openers and connectives that persuade when writing persuasive language texts at Primary Level?

It is important to use sequence words and phrases as sentence openers and connectives that persuade when writing persuasive language texts at primary level to link or connect your sentences, ideas and whole paragraphs together.  Connectives (linking words) should be carefully chosen in persuasive writing to make sure your paragraphs are linked logically.

Below is a table of persuasive writing sentence openers and connectives that you can use for primary level English:

Persuasive Writing Sentence Openers: Sequence Words and Phrases: In the first place…, Secondly…, Also…,

Finally…,

In conclusion

Persuasive Writing Sentence Openers That Persuade:

The fact is…,

Most agree that…,

One reason is…,

It is important to…,

Furthermore…,

It would be better if…,  

Another reason is…

 

Persuasive Writing Connectives that   Persuade: Connectives on Emphasis: clearly, above all, especially,

indeed,

in fact,

surely,

significantly,

naturally,

more important(ly),

of course,

undoubtedly,

obviously,

(un)fortunately,

 Connectives on Opinion:

it would seem,

it appears,

supposedly,

on the strength of,

some people believe,

 in   my opinion,

on the other hand,

however,

even so,

despite this

 Connectives that Illustrate:

for example,

for instance,

such as,

in other words,

as shown by,

to show that,

this can be seen in,

except for,

unless

Private Home Tutoring of English Not an On-Line Free Tutoring Service

I am NOT an on-line free tutoring service.  My resources on this website are for general use only.  I do not write student’s essays for them or give advice on essay prompts. However, for more intensive tutoring in a specific area of English, I will visit students in their own homes for private tutoring sessions that are paid on an hourly basis.

 

Persuasive Language Texts for Primary Level

What are Persuasive Language Texts for Primary Level?

Persuasive language texts used at primary level are also called ‘exposition texts’ (a commonly used term in Naplan Tests).  These persuasive language texts are written for the purpose of presenting a point of view in favour or against a specific topic.  The ultimate aim is to try to convince the reader to agree with your opinion, or take a certain course of action, by giving reasons and examples to support your ideas.

Persuasive Language Texts:

  • are emotive
  • are biased
  • sound authoritative

Persuasive Language Texts Structure:

  1. Introduction = includes a statement to give the author’s opinion / preview important arguments / engage the reader’s attention
  2. Body = includes a series of paragraphs / gives a new idea or argument with reasons and examples to support it in each paragraph / uses persuasive language / uses quoted or reported speech / uses cohesive language to link ideas between paragraphs
  3. Conclusion = restates the position of the writer / sums up the main arguments / includes request action to be taken by the reader / does not give any new information

Persuasive Language Texts for Primary Level Writing Plan

Use this persuasive language writing plan when brainstorming ideas for your topic.  Remember that each new paragraph should be a new idea / argument with reasons and examples to support it.

1 Persuasive Writing Topic
2 Your Title of the Piece =  based on how you are arguing either for or against the topic
3 Introduction of your Opinion = your main opinion (contention) why you are either for or against the topic
4 1st Main Idea = including first supporting reason and evidence of one point of view
5 2nd Main Idea = including supporting reason and evidence of another point of view
6 3rd Main Idea = including supporting reason and evidence of another point of view
7 Conclusion = that restates your main opinion

 When brainstorming for your persuasive language contention, think about:

  • what is your point of view on the persuasive language topic?
  • what are your arguments, either for or against the topic with reasons and examples to explain them?
  • planning your writing to make sure you clearly state what you think about the topic
  • writing your introduction that clearly sets out your opinion
  • remember you are writing to persuade a reader to agree with your own opinions
  • writing sentences that stay on the topic and are relevant
  • starting each new idea in a new paragraph
  • writing a conclusion to give your summary of the main points and final comment on your opinion
  • remember to check your spelling and edit your writing when you are finished

Private Home Tutoring of English Not an On-Line Free Tutoring Service

I am NOT an on-line free tutoring service.  My resources on this website are for general use only.  I do not write student’s essays for them or give advice on essay prompts. However, for more intensive tutoring in a specific area of English, I will visit students in their own homes for private tutoring sessions that are paid on an hourly basis.

 

 

Adjective Word Bank for Creative Writing

Why Use an Adjective Word Bank for Creative Writing?

An Adjective Word Bank is especially useful to help you build a more advanced vocabulary for creative writing tasks.  Teachers are always looking to boost the vocabulary of their students, and by learning new adjectives, students can become more effective writers and speakers.

List of Adjectives for your Word Bank

Below is a short adjective word bank that can get you started on your way to building your own adjective list.  These words can be used to describe feelings and appearances of objects and can make it easy to describe yourself, your surroundings, and your favourite things.  You can use this list to build your own adjective word bank, adding words you like and removing words you do not, replacing them with even more descriptive words.  By keeping this adjective word bank list on your desk as you write, you can refer to it and learn to add more descriptive words into your writing.

adorable adventurous aggressive agreeable
alive amused angry alert
annoying anxious arrogant ashamed
attractive average awful bad
beautiful better bewildered black
bloody blue blue-eyed blushing
bored brainy brave breakable
bright busy calm careful
cautious charming cheerful clean
clear clever cloudy clumsy
colourful combative comfortable concerned
condemned confused cooperative courageous
crazy creepy crowded cruel
curious cute dangerous dark
dead defeated defiant delightful
depressed determined different difficult
disgusted distinct disturbed dizzy
doubtful drab dull eager
easy elated elegant embarrassed
enchanting encouraging energetic enthusiastic
envious evil excited expensive
exuberant fair faithful famous
fancy fantastic fierce filthy
fine foolish fragile frail
frantic friendly frightened funny
gentle gifted glamorous gleaming
glorious good gorgeous graceful
grieving grotesque grumpy handsome
happy healthy helpful helpless
hilarious homeless homely horrible
hungry hurt ill important
impossible inexpensive innocent inquisitive
itchy jealous jittery jolly
joyous kind lazy light
lively lonely long lovely
lucky magnificent misty modern
motionless muddy mushy mysterious
nasty naughty nervous nice
nutty obedient obnoxious odd
old-fashioned open outrageous outstanding
panicky perfect plain pleasant
poised poor powerful precious
prickly proud puzzled quaint
real relieved repulsive rich
scary selfish shiny shy
silly sleepy smiling smoggy
sore sparkling splendid spotless
stormy strange stupid successful
super talented tame tender
tense terrible testy thankful
thoughtful thoughtless tired tough
troubled ugliest ugly uninterested
unsightly unusual upset uptight
vast victorious vivacious wandering
weary wicked wide-eyed wild
witty worrisome worried wrong
zany zealous

Private Home Tutoring of English Not an On-Line Free Tutoring Service

I am NOT an on-line free tutoring service.  My resources on this website are for general use only.  I do not write student’s essays for them or give advice on essay prompts. However, for more intensive tutoring in a specific area of English, I will visit students in their own homes for private tutoring sessions that are paid on an hourly basis.

 

Essay Command Terms

What is an Essay Command Term?

When writing an essay for a test, SAC or exam there are specific essay command terms that you must interpret in order to answer and write what the teacher or examiner wants in that particular essay.

A very common essay command term used as a prompt in years 11 and 12 is the essay command term “discuss”.  It is very important that you follow this directional prompt carefully.  Do not just discuss the topic only.  You must also include both sides of the topic ie. the pros and cons as well as the implications they might have in context.

Here are some of the most important essay command terms with an explanation of what you are required to write:

Account for – requires an explanation or reason for an event or situation.  For example, account for the apparent rise in the average IQ – this does not mean write at length about who noted it or how they found it, or describe the history of IQ testing, or even debate whether IQ exists.  Rather, look at social, statistical, intellectual or procedural reasons why it might have happened.  These should include explanations from existing sources, but it’s worth trying to think of an original idea to add to the mix.

Assess – explain how important it is, e.g. assess the effect of television violence on children who watch it.  This would require evidence from research studies, together with an opinion on what it all means about the effect, and whether indeed it is a real effect.

Compare – consider the two or more subjects given: how they are alike, and how they are different.  If appropriate, views on whether one has more benefits than the other, or more negatives, would add substance.

Contrast – look just at the difference between what the question mentions.  If it fits into the wording of the question, add what is better about each one, and why. Differentiate is similar, but is often used where two things are easily confused.

Define – explain the meaning of a topic word.  This is usually followed by another instruction, possibly from this list, which will be at least as important as defining the term.

Discuss – a broad term.  Usually a brief explanation of the topic or item to discuss could be helpful, but the main thrust is to give the pros and cons, and then to go on to mention the implications they might have.

Evaluate – similar to assess.  It requires an in-depth look at the positives and negatives, with reference to research and any other sources.

Illustrate – explain the topic clearly, then quote examples and actual evidence which is relevant to it.  This is not a term which demands personal opinion.

Relate – an explanation of the relationship and links between the two or more things. It is all too easy to digress from this clear direction, for example lurching into a detailed description of each term or topic in great detail.

Trace– describe and explain the progression of the topic.  For example, “Trace the Development of the Superstore” would require a description of how it evolved to its present form from the earliest shops, or even from local market trading or bartering unless the question says otherwise.  Some explanation of why each step may have arisen would be good, providing time and word count permit – again unless the question specifically says not to do so.

Private Home Tutoring of English Not an On-Line Free Tutoring Service

I am NOT an on-line free tutoring service.  My resources on this website are for general use only.  I do not write student’s essays for them or give advice on essay prompts. However, for more intensive tutoring in a specific area of English, I will visit students in their own homes for private tutoring sessions that are paid on an hourly basis.